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Slipping On Ice Claims

Slip and fall on ice – Who is to blame?

We offer advice to individuals who have suffered personal injury following a fall slipping on ice or snow in the UK.

 

Be aware that in most circumstances on the public highway (including pavements) you are unlikely to be able to make a claim for compensation. More is explained below. However you can possibly claim in the following circumstances:

 

If you have been injured:

  • On business premises (shop, supermarket etc)
  • Or on your employers premises (your place of work or potentially elsewhere if on duty)

 

If the business owner(s) failed to grit and make the area safe – there could well be a claim for a slipping incident.

We are a UK law firm who specialise in ice accidents of this kind. Contact us today for an immediate opinion on your case.

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Slipping On Ice Enquiry

Why not make a free enquiry?

We can help you make a claim for compensation after a slip or fall on ice. If you are injured as a result of slipping on ice get in touch to make a FREE and informal enquiry about your case

More information:

The majority of  accidents generally fall under the responsibility of the local council’s or authority. There is much legal debate about how far a councils duty of care should go as far as gritting or salting is concerned.

It has to be accepted that any council would have an impossible task trying to make safe or grit/salt every highway, pavement or public area during a cold spell of weather. This has to be borne in mind when you consider whether a claim should be made. The law on the subject is varied and different solicitors will have different views. Many claims fail because they don’t meet vital criteria

If the liability is for negligence, and not for a breach of section 41(1) of the Highways Act 1980, there may also be liability under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957. This Act imposes a different duty and a different standard from the Highways Act 1980. The occupier of shops, offices, car parks and similar places will have a far greater obligation to take such care as is reasonable in all the circumstances for the safety of visitors.

For example, a station car park is a place to which drivers are “invited” as are rail passengers and leaving it un-gritted on an icy night is a breach of the duty of the station owner or controller under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957; The duty in negligence is the same as the duty under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957.

Advice to individuals who have suffered personal injury following a fall on ice or snow in the UK. The majority of  accidents generally fall under the responsibility of the local council’s or authority. There is much legal debate about how far a councils duty of care should go as far as gritting or salting is concerned. Please read our free download on the right for more information.

It has to be accepted that any council would have an impossible task trying to make safe or grit/salt every highway, pavement or public area during a cold spell of weather. This has to be borne in mind when you consider whether a claim should be made. The law on the subject is varied and different solicitors will have different views. Many claims fail because they don’t meet vital criteria

If the liability is for negligence, and not for a breach of section 41(1) of the Highways Act 1980, there may also be liability under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957. This Act imposes a different duty and a different standard from the Highways Act 1980. The occupier of shops, offices, car parks and similar places will have a far greater obligation to take such care as is reasonable in all the circumstances for the safety of visitors.

For example, a station car park is a place to which drivers are “invited” as are rail passengers and leaving it un-gritted on an icy night is a breach of the duty of the station owner or controller under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957; The duty in negligence is the same as the duty under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957.

Here are some additional points to consider before bringing a claim in these circumstances.


Some Highway Authorities are under the mistaken belief that they cannot be liable for claims for personal injury arising from a failure to de-ice their roads. They are wrong.

It does require the people occupying the premises to: take account of weather forecasts to have salt in stock; to clear a safe path through the snow; and to put up warning notices or shut the premises if necessary.

It is not a defence for a defendant to say that members of the public are invited onto premises but run their own risk of skidding on compacted snow that it was reasonable for the defendant to have cleared up;

It will be difficult for a defendant to raise a defence on the basis that the cost of remedy is too high. When balanced against the cost of a compensation claim, the above measures can only be considered reasonable under the circumstances. Judges may find negligence in some of the following circumstances: where there is no system for spreading grit; where, although there is a system for spreading grit, the actual spreading does not follow the system; if the system itself is inadequate. For example, there is no consideration of weather forecasts or no salt in stock; if other occupiers have gritted but the defendant has not; if there are no tools for clearing snow and ice or spreading grit; if a Highways Authority has failed to comply with the “Code of Good Practice” or its own local practice standards.

We discuss what circumstances may lead to a no win no fee compensation claim being made and what steps should be taken to pursue such a claim. The Claims Connection trip slip or fall claims section – UK tripping claim and personal injury compensation specialists. Read more about trips and slips not involving ice or related weather conditions.

If you have an issue with the maintenance or condition of your street you may be able to report it online at http://www.fixmystreet.com/.

More links: British safety website Winter footwear safetyCar park ice accidents businesses

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